Rainbow Six Siege: Pick Your Battles

Written by DocWhiskey

Everyone wants to be a hero, especially when it comes down to being the man (or woman) behind a particularly satisfying clutch play that results in a favorable outcome in the round. Siege is all about risk versus reward, and sometimes it pays off. Having additional information fed to you from the teammates who’ve been dispatched already can make things significantly easier, but not really any less stressful if you’re at a numbers disadvantage. The key to it all is knowing when to make the play, and then having the gun skill, gadget placement, etc. to make it happen.

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Lets talk about peeking. Peeker’s advantage is something that just about every Siege player has heard of, and probably blamed a time or two for their demise, especially when it’s that same dirty Ash main fast peeking corners with her no headshot hitbox havin’ ass. Many times I’ve heard it attributed to the Attacking team more than the Defending team, but it can really go either way. To get really controversial with it right off the bat, there is no such thing as “peeker’s advantage”. When a round starts, the defense sets up in such a way that they would expect to be able to hold an objective with the greatest efficiency, meanwhile the attackers are gathering information and learning what they can about it before the shit hits the fan. Moving forward, the round starts and the attackers move in to start their set up for site take, and as they are doing so, you could well understand that they’re going to be a little on edge right out of the gate. They would expect a roamer around every corner, and even with someone droning ahead it’s possible to miss a defender. The attacker would be clearing corners and rooms with the expectation that they would be firing at any second, while at the same time the defender might know they are being pushed, but not exactly when they are going to be pushed. Now the defender decides to flip the script, and the attacker knows that an enemy is in the room but they’re not sure when the defender might attempt to engage them. As soon as these two lines converge it comes down to reaction speed, and gun play, and whoever has the better aim or reaction time generally comes out on top.

 

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Picking your engagement, especially when playing roamers, is pretty crucial to the overall success of your play. Assuming you’ve survived the drone phase without getting spotted or playing Vigil, who can hide from drone camera feeds, you’re likely set up somewhere offsite or deep roaming along common attacker routes of ingress. Knowing that the goal of the roamer is to slow down an attack push, pick up a kill or two to help swing the advantage of the round into your teams favor, it is good to practice trigger discipline, and not mag dump on the first enemy you see, because if their team has any kind of coordination at all then they most likely have a friend nearby ready to pick up the refrag, and even though you’ve managed to stall them for a couple of seconds, the man advantage is brought back into balance, as all things should be. However, had you waited an extra three or four seconds before engaging, you might have seen that second battle buddy go by, and then you’re in a situation where you can turn the round into a 5v3 in your favor fairly quickly. Now if the attackers are doing their homework, they’ve probably got someone checking out the rooms around them as they go, which brings us full circle back to the first paragraph, with neither player really knowing when the other is going to make a move.

 

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Moving on, lets talk about man disadvantage and clutch situations. Against coordinated teams, clutching a round at a 1v3-5 situation can be a daunting prospect, but it’s not altogether impossible, just really difficult. In situations like this, especially on maps that’ve been out for long periods of time it can be pretty safely assumed that attackers will be in certain areas, like server room on Bank or main stairs on Clubhouse. Using this information, plus whatever intel gadgets your team has at their disposal can and will aid you in your clutch attempt. Exposing yourself to these common angles is definitely not the ideal scenario, and being dead severely hampers one’s ability to make great plays. Instead, play around them, try to even out the numbers a bit before you try to retake the site or deal with the rest of the enemies. The same thing can be said on the attacking side. Most times there are some pretty default defense set ups, and it’s not really a matter of which operator is holding which angle as it is knowing that there is absolutely an enemy watching an approach, or holding a tight angle. Once again, information is king in a situation like this, and once again we go right back full circle to the first paragraph. Most all of these same ideas pertain to not only clutch scenarios, but to man disadvantage scenarios as well, but can be a little bit less intimidating knowing that you have a teammate to back you up, at least until Glaz puts a bullet in their head from three rooms over. No matter how you swing it, any kind of clutch or man disadvantage situation is difficult to overcome, but when you do manage to get the job done, it is a really awesome feeling.

 

Armed with some new information, or perhaps known information presented in a new way, I hope this has been helpful for all you new Siegers, and perhaps for some of the more experienced players. The Road to the Six Invitational is on, and there’s no better chance to see some great plays and strategies than by watching the best of the best squaring off against each other.

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